Our Seminars in 2018


Towards the Terminator: the evolution of and barriers to Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems

Presenter(s): Glenn Kolomeitz, Ex-Australian Army Legal Officer

Date: Nov 15, 2018
Time: 4pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building

Abstract: The use of weapon systems in warfare with varying degrees of autonomy is not a new concept with the development and integration of robotics in weaponry evolving over the last century. From the Kettering “Bug” Aerial Torpedo of 1917 through German “Goliath” remote-control mini-tanks in World War II to British unmanned ground vehicles used for explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) in the 1970s and the prevalence of drones in the contemporary battlespace, unmanned weapon systems in ground, air and naval warfare are a reality which are here to stay. With visions of autonomous robotic soldiers of the theatrical “Terminator” variety vivid in the minds of some commentators, a number of significant issues arise in the development and deployment of increasingly more autonomous weapons – weapons which, once activated, can select and engage targets without further intervention by a human operator. Such issues include: (1) determining the legally acceptable uses of lethal autonomous weapon systems (LAWS) within the range of military operations, ie, can a machine comply with the law of armed conflict /international humanitarian law or, indeed, can a machine be more compliant than a human noting the emotion and fear has been removed from any conflict involving a machine; and (2) determining the ethically acceptable and advisable uses of LAWS within the range of military operations, ie, should a machine be able to make the decision to kill a human being? Who should or could be held responsible or accountable in the event the machine makes an unlawful or inappropriate decision to kill a human? The further consideration is whether nations which restrict the development and deployment of LAWS on legal, moral or ethical grounds are making themselves vulnerable due to the development and deployment of such weapon systems by potential adversaries who are unlikely to apply the same constraints?

Speaker Bio:Glenn Kolomeitz is the principal lawyer of a pro bono veterans’ legal practice. He is a veteran of the conflicts in East Timor and Afghanistan, is a former NSW police officer with experience in prosecutions, coronial investigations and counter-terrorism intelligence and was the Defence and Strategic Policy Adviser to a shadow minister for Defence from 2005 to 2006. In addition to undergraduate law, policing and intelligence analysis degrees, Glenn has postgraduate qualifications in strategic intelligence, defence studies, international law, investigations management, military law, management and business administration.


Intelligent Information Technologies for the Future Battlespace

Presenter(s): Dr Angela Consoli, Research Scientist

Date: Nov 12, 2018
Time: 4pm onwards
Venue: 6.312 – Smart Building


Opportunities and Risks in Blockchain Technologies: A perspective beyond Bitcoins

Presenter(s): Prof. Bhuvan Unhelkar, Professor of IT at the University of South Florida

Date: Nov 8, 2018
Time: 4pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building

Abstract: While Bitcoin is a word on everyone's lips, the underlying technology that has enabled it is Blockchains. The ability to have a distributed public ledger opens up opportunities to have decentralized transactions that are beyond simply financial ones. Law enforcement, Smart contracts and Patient care are some examples where an open, distributed architecture of Blockchains can play a vital role. This talk outlines Blockchain as a technology, explains Bitcoins as only one application of the technologies and then explores the various areas of application for Blockchain. The Risks associated with the application are also discussed.

Speaker Bio:Dr Bhuvan Unhelkar (BE, MDBA, MSc, PhD; FACS; PSM-I, CBAP®) is an accomplished IT professional and Professor of IT at the University of South Florida, Sarasota-Manatee (Lead Faculty). He is also Founding Consultant at MethodScience and a Co-Founder/Director at PlatiFi. He has mastery in Business Analysis & Requirements Modeling, Software Engineering, Big Data Strategies, Agile Processes, Mobile Business and Green IT. His domain experience is banking, financial, insurance, government and telecommunications. Bhuvan is a thought-leader and a prolific author of 20 books – including Big Data Strategies for Agile Business and The Art of Agile Practice (Taylor and Francis/CRC Press, USA). Recent Cutter executive reports (Boston, USA) include Psychology of Agile, Business Transformation, Collaborative Business & Enterprise Agility and Agile in Practice-a Composite approach. He is a winner of the Computerworld Object Developer Award (1995), Consensus IT Professional Award (2006) and IT Writer Award (2010). He has a Doctorate in the area of “Object Orientation” from the University of Technology, Sydney, in 1997. Bhuvan is Fellow of the Australian Computer Society, IEEE Senior Member, Professional Scrum Master, Life member of Computer Society of India and Baroda Management Association, Member of SDPS, Past President of Rotary Sarasota Sunrise (Florida) & St. Ives (Sydney), Paul Harris Fellow (+6), Discovery volunteer at NSW parks and wildlife, and a previous TiE Mentor.


Declarative Business Processes: Discovery and Reasoning

Presenter(s): Claudio Di Ciccio ,Assistant Professor at WU Vienna, Austria

Date: Oct 4, 2018
Time: 4pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building

Abstract: The declarative modelling of business processes is based upon the specification of behavioral rules that constrain the enactment of workflows. The carry-out of the process is up to the actors, who can vary the execution dynamics as long as they do not violate the constraints imposed by the declarative model. The constraints specify the conditions that require or forbid the execution of activities, either considering them singularly or depending on the occurrence of other ones. In this talk, the recent advancements in the automated discovery of declarative control flows from process data are discussed, together with open challenges and future research directions in the field.

Speaker Bio: Claudio Di Ciccio is an assistant professor with the Institute for Information Business and member of the Research Institute for Cryptoeconomics at the Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU Vienna), Austria. His research interests include process mining, declarative process modelling, and cryptoeconomics. He has published more than 50 research papers and articles, among others in Information Systems, Decision Support Systems, ACM Transactions on Management Information Systems, and IEEE Internet Computing. He is member of the IEEE Task Force on Process Mining. He serves as a reviewer for international journals, including ACM TOSEM, Information Systems, and DKE, and has been a PC member of conferences and workshops, such as BPM, IJCAI, and ICSSP. He is the organizer of international workshops including the Workshop on Declarative/Decision/Hybrid Mining and Modelling for Business Processes (DeHMiMoP). In 2015, he received the best paper award of the 13th conference on Business Process Management. In August 2018 he has been nominated Researcher of the Month at the Vienna University of Economics and Business. He obtained his Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering with honorable mention in 2013 at Sapienza, University of Rome, with a thesis on the automated discovery of flexible workflows from semi-structured text data sources.


Modeling Decision-intensive Processes with Declarative Business Artifacts

Presenter(s): Dr. Rik Eshuis ,Assistant Professor at Eindhoven University

Date: Sep 4, 2018
Time: 4pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building

Abstract: Modern business processes often need to support knowledge workers in making decisions about real-world business entities such as orders and quotes. Such decision-intensive processes are driven by data and require substantial flexibility. Business artifacts model data and process aspects of business entities in a holistic way and therefore are well suited to model data-driven processes. Declarative process models support flexible process executions. This makes declarative business artifacts a promising ingredient to support decision-intensive processes. However, there are several challenges that need to be overcome in order to support real-world decision-intensive processes with declarative business artifacts. This talk discusses some of those challenges, illustrated with real-world scenarios, and discusses promising solutions to overcome them.

Speaker Bio: Dr. Rik Eshuis is Assistant Professor of Information Systems at Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands. He received an M.Sc. degree with distinction and a Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of Twente. He has been a visiting researcher at IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Centre in New York and at CRP Henri Tudor in Luxembourg. He was in 2009 the General Chair of the IEEE European Conference on Web Services (ECOWS). His main research interests is in data-driven business process management for knowledge and decision-intensive processes. He has published in various journals, e.g., Information Systems, Data & Knowledge Engineering, and IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering and conferences like BPM and ECIS. He is a member of the IEEE, the IEEE Computer Society, and the ACM.


Advances in Neural Turing Machines

Presenter(s): Dr. Truyen Tran

Date: Aug 30, 2018
Time: 4pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building

Abstract: One of the most important developments in the past 5 years in deep learning is the invention of memory-augmented neural networks. Neural Turing machine (NTM) is one of such architectures. The aim is ambitious: NTM can, in theory, approximate any computer program, and indeed can, in practice, learn certain programs from examples. In this talk, I will present our recent contributions in improving NTM operations (read, write, encode and decode) as well as introducing a relational structure into the memory. Applications in a variety of fields (software, business process modelling, healthcare, dialog systems) will also presented.


Quality-Impacting Practices in Software Development

Presenter(s): Dr Patanamon Thongtanunam –  University of Adelaide

Date: July 11, 2018
Time: 4pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building

Abstract: Software is a byproduct of human activities. To strive for the successful completion of a software product, software development requires deep collaboration and interactions among software practitioners, especially for globally-distributed software development teams. Due to the continuously growing size of development teams and software products, collaboration management becomes a crucial concern. For example, poor collaboration in software development processes may lead to poor software quality. However, good practices still remains an elusive goal. Therefore, Dr Thongtanunam's research focuses on incorporating various sources of development activities, gleaning actionable insights for software engineering management, and providing tool support for software practitioners with the aim of improving software quality. In this talk, Dr Thongtanunam will present her empirical studies which highlight the impact of code review practices on software quality and discuss some of her proposed tool support (e.g., a reviewer recommendation algorithm).

Speaker Bio:Dr Patanamon Thongtanunam is a lecturer at the School of Computer Science, the University of Adelaide. She was a postdoctoral research fellow at Queen's University, Canada. She received a PhD degree from Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Japan. Her primary research goals are directed towards data-driven software engineering, i.e., uncovering empirical evidence and extracting knowledge from data recorded in software repositories by using statistical analysis. Her research has been published at top-tier software engineering venues like International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE) and Journal of Empirical Software Engineering (EMSE). Her research and scholarly endeavours have been acknowledged with numerous awards, scholarships, and research grants ranging from university-specific to nationwide including the most prestigious funding in Japan from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). To date, she received a total research grant of A$123,000 from JSPS, NEC C&C Foundation, Queen's University, and MEXT. More about Patanamon and her work is available online at http://patanamon.com.


The Risks of Unsound Software Analytics: Why Practitioners Should Care?

Presenter(s): Dr. Chakkrit Tantithamthavorn – lecturer at the School of Computer Science, the University of Adelaide, Australia

Date: July 10, 2018
Time: 12:30pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building

Abstract: Many software organisations (e.g., Microsoft, Facebook, and Google) currently use powerful data analytics (e.g., statistical and machine learning techniques) to predict and explain the risks of software changes that lead to future defects. However, such predictions and explanations may be invalid if practitioners do not consider the risks of unsound software analytics, leading to invalid predictions and explanations. In the past 4 years, I have conducted a series of empirical investigation to evaluate techniques and identify best practices to develop theoretically sound and actionable analytical models to improve software quality and development processes. In this talk, I will discuss why practitioners should care about the risks of building unsound software analytics. Throughout the talk, I will provide concrete examples while proposing best practices that our SE community should follow to avoid such risks.

Speaker Bio:Dr. Chakkrit Tantithamthavorn is a lecturer at the School of Computer Science, the University of Adelaide, Australia. Prior to that, he was a research fellow at Queen's University (Canada) and Nara Institute of Science and Technology (Japan). During his Ph.D. study, he won one of the most prestigious funding in Japan, i.e., a JSPS Research Fellowship for Young Researchers and a Grants-in-Aid for JSPS Fellow, and won a "Best Ph.D. Student Award". His work has been published at several top-tier software engineering venues, such as the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering (TSE), the Springer Journal of Empirical Software Engineering (EMSE), and the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE). His current research aims to address the fundamental issues of analytical modelling for software engineering in order to produce more accurate predictions and explanations. His research interests also include empirical software engineering and mining software repositories (MSR). More about Chakkrit and his work is available online at http://chakkrit.com.


The Computational Conscience: A platform for exploring the ethical implications of human and machine action

Presenter(s): Dr Aditya ghose –  University of Wollongong

Date: Jun 21, 2018
Time: 4pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building


Business Algorithmics: Strategic Analysis

Presenter(s): PROF. JOHN MYLOPOULOUS –  University of Toronto

Date: May 22, 2018
Time: 1:30pm onwards
Venue: 6.209 – Smart Building

Speaker Bio:Professor Mylopoulos is Professor Emertius at the University of Toronto and a Visiting Professor at the University of Ottawa. In 2015, he was recognised as a Distinguished Professor by the Italian Government. He received his BEng degree from Brown University in 1966 and his PhD degree from Princeton in 1970, the year he joined the faculty of the University of Toronto. His research interests include requirements engineering, data semantics and knowledge management. He retired from Toronto in 2009, and joined the University of Trento (Italy) where he led a large European project on Software Engineering (2011-16). Mylopoulos is the recipient of the first Outstanding Services Award given by the Canadian AI Society (1992), a co-recipient of the most influential paper award of the 1994 International Conference on Software Engineering, a fellow of the American Association for AI (AAAI), the elected president of the VLDB Endowment (1998-01, re-elected for the period 2002-05), and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.


Smart Contracts: From Contracts to Blockchain Processes

Presenter(s): PROF. JOHN MYLOPOULOUS –  University of Toronto

Date: May 28, 2018
Time: 1:30pm onwards
Venue: 6.209 – Smart Building

Speaker Bio:Professor Mylopoulos is Professor Emertius at the University of Toronto and a Visiting Professor at the University of Ottawa. In 2015, he was recognised as a Distinguished Professor by the Italian Government. He received his BEng degree from Brown University in 1966 and his PhD degree from Princeton in 1970, the year he joined the faculty of the University of Toronto. His research interests include requirements engineering, data semantics and knowledge management. He retired from Toronto in 2009, and joined the University of Trento (Italy) where he led a large European project on Software Engineering (2011-16). Mylopoulos is the recipient of the first Outstanding Services Award given by the Canadian AI Society (1992), a co-recipient of the most influential paper award of the 1994 International Conference on Software Engineering, a fellow of the American Association for AI (AAAI), the elected president of the VLDB Endowment (1998-01, re-elected for the period 2002-05), and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.


A calculus for requirements engineering founded on argumentation theory

Presenter(s): PROF. JOHN MYLOPOULOUS –  University of Toronto

Date: May 24, 2018
Time: 4pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building

Abstract: The requirements problem consists of transforming stakeholder requirements - however informal, ambiguous, conflicting, unattainable, imprecise and incomplete – into a consistent, complete and realizable specification through a systematic process. We propose a refinement calculus for requirements engineering (CaRE) for solving this problem, which takes into account the typically dialectic nature of requirements activities. The calculus casts the requirement problem as an iterative argument between stakeholders and requirements engineers, where posited requirements are attacked for being ambiguous, incomplete, etc. and refined into new requirements that address the defect pointed out by the attack. Refinements are carried out by operators provided by CaRE that refine (e.g., strengthen, weaken, decompose) existing requirements, to build a refinement graph. The semantics of the operators is provided by means of argumentation theory.

Speaker Bio:Professor Mylopoulos is Professor Emertius at the University of Toronto and a Visiting Professor at the University of Ottawa. In 2015, he was recognised as a Distinguished Professor by the Italian Government. He received his BEng degree from Brown University in 1966 and his PhD degree from Princeton in 1970, the year he joined the faculty of the University of Toronto. His research interests include requirements engineering, data semantics and knowledge management. He retired from Toronto in 2009, and joined the University of Trento (Italy) where he led a large European project on Software Engineering (2011-16). Mylopoulos is the recipient of the first Outstanding Services Award given by the Canadian AI Society (1992), a co-recipient of the most influential paper award of the 1994 International Conference on Software Engineering, a fellow of the American Association for AI (AAAI), the elected president of the VLDB Endowment (1998-01, re-elected for the period 2002-05), and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.


Context-Aware Resource Allocation in Knowledge Intensive Processes

Presenter(s): Prof. Dr. Matthias Weidlich –  Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Date: May 15, 2018
Time: 5pm onwards
Venue: 6.312 – Smart Building

Abstract: Resource allocation refers to matching tasks of a business process to right process participants or resources. In knowledge intensive process, human workers play a crucial role in process execution and performance. Existing techniques largely rely on the organizational role of the resources for allocation decisions. However, process execution data from a range of sources suggest that human workers with the same organizational role and capabilities can have heterogeneous efficiencies based on their operational context. Evidence from process execution logs further suggests that resource efficiencies can vary depending on process instance attributes and the context, in which these instances are executed. Current approaches on resource allocation have not considered process context, process instance attributes and resource efficiency together.


Event-Driven Analysis of Service Processes: Methods and Platforms

Presenter(s): Prof. Dr. Matthias Weidlich –  Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Date: May 8, 2018
Time: 5pm onwards
Venue: 6.105 – Smart Building

Abstract: In domains such as e-commerce, logistics, or healthcare, the conduct of service processes is widely supported by information systems and event data is generated continuously during process execution. Such event data constitutes a valuable source of information, once abstractions of low-level data that are suitable for process analysis have been identified. In this talk, we first present a method to learn such abstractions, formalised as queries over streams of events, using a multi-stage processing pipeline. We then turn to the efficient realisation of this approach for large-scale datasets. Acknowledging the need to explore various configurations of the mining method, we present meta-dataflows as a model and platform for the efficient execution of exploratory processing pipelines on compute clusters.

Speaker Bio:Prof. Dr. Matthias Weidlich leads the Process-Driven Architectures group at the Department of Computer Science at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU), which is funded by the German Research Foundation in the Emmy-Noether Programme. Earlier, he held positions at Imperial College London, UK, and the Technion, Israel. He holds a PhD in Computer Science from the Hasso-Plattner-Institute, University of Potsdam, Germany. His research focuses on process-oriented and event-driven information systems, including methods for their specification, their data-driven analysis, and optimisations of their run-time behaviour. He is a Junior-Fellow of the German Informatics Society and recipient of the Berlin Young Researcher Award 2016.